Tag Archives: four noble truths

#47_May 2016 – Take a Break

Take a Break.

….before you have to. For some reason holding down two jobs, doing charity work helping small businesses, managing a household and planning an international move was not enough of a signal to clear some space for some inner work.
There are times when stretching yourself with multiple challenges leads to great breakthroughs, whether in knowledge, understanding or the sense of wholeness that comes through helping someone else achieve their goals. Other times you may be filling your time, running about being ‘busy busy’ because you are avoiding being with yourself, being quiet; facing the reality of who you really are in that moment.
For me, during those few months when one year ends and another begins – in this case 2016 – I was transitioning from being in one country to moving to another, physically and mentally. I became disconnected and distracted by to-do lists rather than taking time to honour the momentum of this change. In the past, if I didn’t find space for myself, events would force it on me.
This time the first whisper was when I fell down a very long flight of stone steps at the new Art Museum on the Padang. I apologise for scaring everyone in the ticket hall who had to witness my messy tumble. Other than severe bruises and a chipped elbow, I was fine.
Did I listen? The louder klaxon came early in January when I turned my ankle and broke it. So now, no choice; I had to take a break. Literally. I recognised the situation that had been created by my actions immediately whilst waiting for the x-ray, and laughed. Don’t wait for the whisper, take that break.

Susan

Final Thoughts

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not, remember that what you now have was once amongst the things you only hoped for.”
~ Epicurus

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The Problem, the Cause, the Goal and the Solution: a 4-week course with Charu Ramesh

June MWCThis four-class MWC course is designed by Lama Marut and lays out the foundational structure of any authentic spiritual path. It explores the basis of the discontent that lies beneath the surface of all our lives, leading us through the reasons for it and the path out of it, outlining a coherent and efficient method for reaching the goal of true happiness.

The structure of the sessions is as follows:

  1. Session 1 – The seesaw of happiness and dissatisfaction (June 6)
  2. Session 2 – The cause of the ups and downs (June 13)
  3. Session 3 – Ending the cycle (June 20)
  4. Session 4 – The path to happiness (June 27)

To really understand and be able to put these teachings into practice, we encourage you to attend all four sessions.

Date:  Mondays, June 6, 13, 20, 27
Time: 7pm to 8.30pm
Venue: 51b Temple Street (top floor) Chinatown, 
​Singapore ​

Cost: By donation. Suggested donation – SGD 10.

Please register by filling in the form below. For enquiries, write to info@asc-sg.org.


About the teacher:

Charu Ramesh practices as a classical homeopath, an I Ching interpreter and a life guide. She teaches dharma classes for ASC and also offers regular classes with TheStillSpace.org. She helps people work with relationships, transitions and the issues that life keeps throwing at all of us. The main thread that runs through her work is empowering people by helping them take responsibility for their lives.


 

#28 October 2014 -Yoga and Me

trikonasana

Yoga and Me

One year ago, I decided to take a break from yoga. I didn’t love the practice any more despite developing a solid practice over many years. Of course I knew that yoga was good for me but my relationship with yoga had become one of ‘must’.  I needed to practice; I had to practice.

When I stopped teaching, I didn’t feel compelled to practice. I stopped attending workshops, and didn’t feel the pressure to keep it up. I rested as much as I needed and did only what I felt like. Some days, I felt resistance. Some days, I didn’t want to stop. But rather than telling myself ‘I must’, I asked myself whether I was truly tired or if I was making excuses. Am I as tired as I thought? Can I not do just one asana? Slowly, by challenging my underlying motivations I built up my practice again.

Working from the frame of mind of ‘must’ there was no room for query and for compassion. In letting go of ‘must’, there was room to gauge my feelings and energy levels. And that brought a more mindful and kinder relationship between my practice and myself.

Do I love the practice now? I am enjoying it and committed to it.

Poh Yen


A Final Thought

“If there ever comes a time that you forget where you came from, you’ve gone too far.”
― Comic Strip Mama

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